E-commerce and Daily Thinking – A Thinkibility Nibble

In our blog post Daily Thinking – Discovering Patterns we showed some alarming daily thinking habits, like assuming that there is a linear, unambiguously relation between a cause and an effect. For example, it is assumed that increasing e-commerce will reduce traffic. People will less go to shopping malls. However, delivering goods, ordered one by one with take-back guarantee will increase …

Advertisements

Thinking outside the Sea Map

In 17th and 18th centuries England, France, and Spain contested the Dutch domination of world trade and the control over the seas and trade routes. After initial English successes, the war ended in a decisive Dutch victory. In 1667 Lieutenant-Admiral Michiel de Ruyter sailed up to the river Thames and attacked the British Royal navy …

Thinking Patterns in Science

Some time ago Robert Sheldrake  suggested ten dogmas of modern science. In a TEDx presentation he argued that science,  by using a rigorous method, has become a belief system that has become the default in the scientific community and this system is based on reductionism and  mechanical philosophy. This idea caused an uproar in the scientific …

Double Bind

In earlier posts "Contradictions and Aggression" and "Don't Think You Can Think" part 1 and part 2 we did some thinking about contradictions, dilemma's and paradoxes. A special case of these are double binds. A double bind exists when an impossible ultimatum is put forward (either/or, however, both alternatives are unacceptable) two directives are in …

World’s Most Interesting Reversals (2) – Thinkibility Boost

As a follow-up of an earlier post about Reversals, we present here some more examples. A Reversal reverses the usual sequence or direction of doing something. For instance: Normally a product is delivered after the customer places the order. A Reversal could be that the customer places the order after the product is delivered. What ideas …

World’s Most Interesting Reversals (1) – Thinkibility Boost

In a Reversal, the usual supposed cause-effect relation between objects or subjects are turned upside down. For example, it is supposed that the establishment of a permanent observation post increases the safety of recreational sailing. A Reversal could set up that the establishment of a permanent observational post rightly effective decreases the safety of sailors. The …

Key Concepts as Optical Filters – Thinkibility Boost

Optical filters are devices that selectively transmit light of different wavelengths. They absorb some wavelengths of light – that is, colors – while transmitting others. Optical filters define what we see and what is left out. Key concepts and filters Key concepts do exactly the same with what we perceive. They strengthen or weaken information, …

Trust or Trustworthiness? – Thinkibility Boost

Trust or Trustworthiness? When searching for ideas for our forthcoming book about Information  & Feelings, a sequel to Positive & Negative in the serie Thinkibility – Thinking about Thinking, Creativity Innovation and Design we stumbled on a broad range of emotions and feelings. If you search this blog on keywords like emotion, feelings and intuition …

Multi-focal thinking

Multi-focal lenses help you to see at different distances and depths. Like the eyes that have to accommodate in order to see at different distances and depths, thinking has to be focused to foreground and background phenomena   A very useful to multi-focal diagnose problems in a complex organization is the System Thinking Iceberg. The …